The 1975: Glasgow Barrowlands

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Emulating the mysterious and alternative styles of the 80’s Manchester alt-pop band, The 1975 walked onto the Glasgow Barrowlands stage after several minutes of taunting with dry-ice and synth music to a crowd of eager fans; most of them barely pushing 18.

Singer Matt Healy cemented the idea that The 1975 are trying a bit too hard to be unique wearing a fur jacket cradling a bottle of red wine, he ended up just looking a little pretentious. Opening the night with crowd pleaser The City, deafening cheers and chants gave hope that a memorable show was about to be put on.

However apart from releasing catchy songs, the edgy haircuts and all black wardrobes alongside their ‘cool-guy’ personas The 1975 are really no different to most acts that have come and gone in the past 20-years; their mix of singles focusing on sex, angst and drugs are good live performance tracks but for an hour long set The 1975 still have a lot to learn.

Since rocketing into the charts with their self-titled debut album last year, The 1975 have not yet put out new material and they have yet to change up their live shows. Taking a break from slower album tracks, allowing a break from Healy smoking and drinking on stage to Me acting like a rejected romantic character, a saxophone player emerged from the smoke to play a killer solo during Heart Out, that allowed a moment of appreciation for something interesting to watch and listen to.

The night truly came to life with the encore featuring the favourites Chocolate and rockier sounding Sex. It’s a great tactic to place your two liveliest songs at the end of the setlist because it fools people into thinking the entire show was lively and interactive; the younger generation seemed to love it anyway.

In all honesty watching a re-run of Loose Women would have been more entertaining.